Momentum and Motivation

I did not want to do a workout today. I was becoming increasingly comfortable with resigning myself to eating leftover pizza and picking something to binge watch on Netflix. After wrestling with it the through the morning, I knew I needed to get it done, but still didn’t feel any more motivated.

Rewind. It was a very busy May as we navigated the end of my daughter’s 1st grade year and addressed some family challenges. I have had some hiccups in my workout programs, but have always looked forward to getting back on track and getting in the groove. It took me almost 3 weeks to get going in my most recent program, 22 Minute Hard Corps, but I was in week 5. And then the wheels fell off. I lost every ounce of motivation to workout. I went almost 2 weeks without getting anything in, and this past Monday was supposed to be my reset day to start over on 22MHC. And then my daughter wanted a donut. And that meant we were all getting donuts. And who in their right mind has a donut without a Mocha Frappe or Coolata? No big deal. I’ll still kill the workout. Except I didn’t. My stellar nutritional choices caused me to do something I’ve not had to do (except for a select few workouts) in a long time. I had to modify to finish. Scratch that. I had to step out from two exercises to finish. Then I was crazy sore Tuesday, and didn’t workout. Then it was worse Wednesday, and… can you guess? Didn’t workout. Thursday I did a Combat workout, but wasn’t feeling particularly motivated.

Back to today. Fortunately, I did not compromise my nutrition this morning, and grabbed a water and was dialed in with intense focus on finishing every rep in every round of Cardio 1. It wasn’t all pretty, but I made it. And it felt awesome! And then I did the Core 1 addon workout, and felt better! And then was motivated to have something other than pizza, and made my chocolate Shakeology, and felt amazing! I was able to see the power of momentum in action, and was reminded to take things one step at a time. I just did that main workout. I have set the goal of losing 15-20 pounds the summer to see if I can not only shed some lazy pounds I let creep back, but to also get to a new personal best. The tricky part will be finding the motivation to keep going when:

1. I am sore
2. I am tired
3. I am busy
4. I just don’t feel like it

I tell you all of that to invite you to join me on my summer endeavor of getting back into a groove with my fitness. Do you have some weight loss or fitness goals that you know are important, but have just had no motivation in getting them done? I can relate. I can also tell you that if you don’t set the goal and make the effort, you’re guaranteed that nothing will get done. If you would benefit from an accountability group, need some coaching (advice) on how to get started, or just want push yourself to your next level of fitness, comment here or on my facebook page or message me. I will be creating the group, “Momentum and motivation”. Free to join; you need only bring a positive attitude and be willing to take the first step 🙂

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The Need to Be Pushed

I have discovered something about myself over the past year and a half of acclimating to a healthier lifestyle and making fitness a priority: I need to be pushed. It was incredibly challenging to go from 276 to 186 lbs, and without question it pushed my physical limits as well as my mental limits in terms of my will power and deciding to remove negative elements of my nutrition. However, as it turns out, I have found that I thrive when I need to “Dig Deep”, and remain committed to a particular regimen.

Case in point: I completed the Les Mills Pump Program in September, and just thought I would kind of hodge podge some workouts together and not put myself on any official regimen. I have seen excellent results in every Beachbody program I have used, but have pretty well stuck to the prescribed schedule. It turns out that without something to push me to do the hard workouts when I was sore or unmotivated, I didn’t do them. My workouts have become sporadic, and my nutrition followed suit pretty quickly. I haven’t been a slave to the scale in some time, but knew things were going in the wrong direction so I jumped on. The damage? 10 POUNDS! That got my attention.

I need to be pushed again. Yes, the workouts can be hard. Sticking to a good nutritional plan can be hard. But what is even harder is to try to make any progress (or even maintain for that matter) without being pushed. I am super pumped to get into Insanity Max 30. I am making sure I can start it next week! I need the push. How about you?

Check out the preview and email, facebook, or message me if you need to jump in on this! Available today, and at a huge discount through Beachbody coaches. Get committed to a good fitness plan before the next round of holiday festivities are here!

The Ten Biggest Mistakes People Make in Setting Goals!

The Ten Biggest Mistakes People Make in Setting Goals! by Michael Hyatt
December 23, 2013 at 11:23am

If you are anything like me, you’re already thinking about the year ahead. How will it be different than this one? What might be possible? What do I want to accomplish?

I don’t know about you, but I have been going through this annual exercise since my second semester of college, when a friend introduced me to the concept. Almost immediately, I loved the concept and saw the potential.
But I have not always done it well. I have made a lot of mistakes along the way. I have also watched numerous other people do it poorly.

Here are the top ten most common mistakes I see people make when it comes to goal-setting:

They don’t write them down. Unless a goal is written, it is merely an aspiration—lifeless and devoid of power. Once you commit it to writing, you set something in motion. You clarify what you want and begin focusing on how to attain it.

They create too many. An old Chinese proverb says, “Man who chases two rabbits catches neither.” While you probably need more than a single goal, you need to stay focused on a manageable number of them. I recommend no more than 7–10.

They only set them for one area of their life. Most people are accustomed to the idea of setting career goals. But life is far more than your job. If you are going to be happy and fulfilled, you need goals in each of the major areas of life—spiritual, physical, marital, relational, etc.

They don’t make them specific. Most goals—even written ones—suffer from being too vague. “I want to write a book” or “I want a better marriage” are too general. Which book do you want to write? How do you want to improve your marriage?

They don’t make them measurable. The only way to know if you have achieved a goal is to quantify it. “Lose 25 pounds” is much better than “lose weight.” “Earn 10% more than I did last year” is better than “earn more money.” When in doubt, assign a number or a percentage.

They don’t assign a due date. So often the important gets sacrificed on the altar of the urgent. A deadline is one way to create urgency and force yourself to pay attention to what’s important. Without a deadline, there’s little pressure to get it done. It’s easy to procrastinate.

They don’t keep them visible. How many times have you written down a set of goals and never looked at them again? I’ve done it plenty of times. That’s why you need a plan to keep them visible, whether that means reviewing them daily, weekly, or at some other regular interval.

They don’t stretch out of their comfort zone. Safe goals are boring goals. Unless we set our goals outside our comfort zone, we won’t find them compelling enough to actually follow through and achieve them. They shouldn’t be unrealistic, but they should be challenging.

They don’t make them personally compelling. When you pursue a meaningful goal, it is exhilarating. Accomplishing it, even more so. But the “messy middle” is where most of us get stuck. This is why we need to write down a set of motivations for each goal identifyingwhy it is important and what is at stake.
They don’t identify the next action. You don’t need an elaborate action plan for each goal. (Often this can just be a fancy way of procrastinating.) But you do need to identify the next action, so you can initiate and maintain momentum.

Chances are, you are going to live through 2014, one way or another. It can be another year just like this year and last. Or it can be something different … something extraordinary … something amazing! The choice is yours.

–Michael Hyatt